40 Houses From Iconic Movies That You Can Actually Visit, Rent Or Even Purchase

Many houses you’ll see in Hollywood films are built inside the confines of a film studio. However, there are several that serve as actual homes in the real world. Indeed, the history of the big screen is littered with properties that have stood long before and long after first appearing onscreen. From Home Alone to Halloween, here’s a look at 40 you can visit, rent or even buy.

40. The Hillards’ home

The Hillard family home seen in family-friendly classic Mrs Doubtfire has become a popular tourist destination since the film’s release in 1993. And one of its stars, Sally Field, certainly made it easy for fans to find. Indeed, the actress’ character Miranda actually reveals the real-life address of the property during the movie. 2640 Steiner is situated in the Pacific Heights neighborhood of San Francisco which also houses the Tanner gang in sitcom Full House.

39. Dr. Frank-n-Furter’s castle

Almost the entirety of cult classic The Rocky Horror Picture Show takes place inside this historic castle. And fans of Richard O’Brien’s madcap scientist Dr. Frank-n-Furter can now enjoy a night’s stay at the property, as it’s since been converted into a hotel. The building – which dates back to 1859 – can be found on the Oakley Court estate in the English county of Berkshire. It’s also been used for many other old school horrors, including The Brides of Dracula.

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38. The Sleepless in Seattle houseboat

Sleepless in Seattle is widely regarded as one of the greatest rom-coms of the 1990s. And fans can now enjoy a vacation at the unique home of Tom Hanks’ character and his young son. Indeed, in 2014 the stunning floating houseboat situated on Lake Union’s Westlake Avenue North was purchased for $2 million. And the buyer rents the iconic property, complete with a flower-clad entrance, out to holidaygoers for part of the year.

37. The Cullen family home

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This stunning property in the Oregon city of Portland was only constructed in 2006. But it has already become a must-see tourist destination for fans of one particular young adult franchise. Indeed, just a year after completion, it was used as the Cullen family home in the phenomenon that is Twilight. Owned by Nike’s footwear design director John Hoke, the building is situated at 3462 NW Quimby Street for those Twihards who suddenly fancy a road trip to Portland.

36. Nancy Thompon’s house

Who knew a simple red front door could be so eerie? Nancy Thompson’s house in seminal horror A Nightmare on Elm Street is set in Ohio. But in real life, the property is situated on 1428 N. Genesee Avenue in Los Angeles. The building has been a tourist attraction ever since Freddy Kreuger first made it onto our screens. And following an extensive renovation it was sold in 2013 for a whopping $2 million.

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35. Cameron’s house

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Fans of John Hughes’ classic 1980s teen movie Ferris Bueller’s Day Off can visit the titular truant’s house in Long Beach, California. But far more impressive is the home of his best friend Cameron in Highland Park, Illinois. Inspired by German architect Ludwidg Mies van der Rohe, the property was designed in 1953 by A. James Speyer. And in 2014 it sold for just over $1 million. It’s best known for the iconic scene where Cameron and co. accidentally reverse his father’s beloved red convertible into a ravine.

34. The Dursleys’ home

This rather unassuming suburban English home became hot property in 2016 when it was put on the market for the approximate sum of $620,000. And that’s because the building was used as the home of the Dursley family in one of the biggest franchises ever, Harry Potter. Known as 4 Pivet Drive to fans of the boy wizard, the building is situated on Picket Post Close in Martins Heron, a neighborhood some 25 miles outside of London.

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33. The McCallisters’ home

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You can see why the Wet Bandits were attracted to this stunning Georgian red-brick home in Home Alone. But of course, they didn’t bank on it being the home of a resourceful eight-year-old capable of terrorizing them. Situated in the Chicago suburb of Winnetka, the setting for the much-loved Christmas film was bought for $1.85 million in 2012. And we can only imagine that its new owner recreated at least one of Macaulay Culkin’s classic scenes after doing so.

32. Miss Trunchbull’s House

Known as the Crank House or Fair Oaks Ranch, this 1882 Victorian-style house was used for two creepy movie moments in the 1990s. It was the home of the Omega Beta Zeta fraternity in Wes Craven’s classic horror sequel Scream 2. But it was first seen onscreen as the abode of a character arguably even scarier than Ghostface – Matilda’s Miss Trunchbull. The property in Altadena, California, featured in the scene where the fearsome headmistress runs after a trespasser.

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31. The Under the Tuscan Sun villa

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We can understand why the character played by Diane Lane in Under The Tuscan Sun decided to buy this charming villa on a whim. And fans of the romantic drama can enjoy their very own Italian getaway in the exact same place. Indeed, the 17th century estate can actually be rented out by the week. Situated in the Tuscany town of Cortona, the property boasts a wine cellar, farmhouse and swimming pool and has been largely left untouched since the release of the 2003 film.

30. The Wallace house

You can visit both the Wallace and the Doyle properties that became houses of horror in John Carpenter’s slasher Halloween. The latter is, of course, the place where Jamie Lee Curtis’ babysitter is terrorized by her own brother Michael Myers. But the it’s the former home across the street that features in the iconic scene where the masked killer is spotted by young Tommy carrying his latest victim. Fans who want the ultimate Halloween experience on October 31 should visit Los Angeles’ Orange Grove Avenue.

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29. Blofeld’s winter home

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Ernst Stavro Blofeld may have been a villainous mastermind, but he sure did have great taste in holiday homes. As seen in Diamonds Are Forever, the evil genius spent the winter seasons in the spectacular Elrod House. Designed by architect John Lautner and situated in Pasadena, the property is celebrated in the architectural world for the way it was built around existing rock formations.

28. The apartment in Rosemary’s Baby

New York’s exclusive apartment complex, The Dakota, has a rich and often disturbing history when it comes to celebrity. Its resident over the years have included Boris Karloff, John Madden, Robert Flack and Judy Garland. But it’s best known for being the place where John Lennon was murdered. It’s also where Mia Farrow’s titular character gives birth to the son of the devil in Roman Polanski’s Rosemary’s Baby.

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27. The Notting Hill apartment

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Remember the Notting Hill scene in which Rhys Ifans’ character opens the front door in his underwear, only to be greeted by an army of paparazzi? Well that blue front door can be seen at 80 Westbourne Park Road in London’s real life Notting Hill. The apartment it belongs to was actually owned by the film’s screenwriter, Richard Curtis, at the time. The comedy veteran later sold the property for some tidy gains.

26. Mother Sister’s house

Fans of Spike Lee’s groundbreaking Do the Right Thing can visit arguably the film’s most significant location. Much of the events depicted occur in and around 169 Stuyvesant Avenue in Brooklyn, aka the home of Ruby Dee’s ever-observing Mother Sister. The property was reportedly bought for just $165,000 back in 1995. But with the film’s cultural cachet, its owner should be able to sell it for a much higher price, should they so wish.

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25. The Tenenbaums’ house

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Few directors understand how important a movie’s location can be to the narrative more than indie favorite Wes Anderson. This grandiose building serves as the main setting for the auteur’s The Royal Tenenbaums and is found at 339 Convent Avenue in New York. Anderson opted for the property – known as 111 Archer Avenue in the film – due to its “storybook quality” after spotting it while driving through Harlem.

24. Holly Golightly’s apartment

The interior shots of Holly Golightly’s apartment in Breakfast at Tiffany’s were filmed in a studio. But the exterior shots were taken at a very real property in the Upper East Side of New York. And more than half a century on from the Audrey Hepburn classic’s release, the building’s front door and stoop appear exactly the same. In the 2010s a couple bought the four-floor townhouse for a sum of nearly $6 million.

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23. The Baker house

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This suburban home might not seem particularly distinctive at first glance. But for fans of 1980s coming-of-age movies, it’s the setting of a very memorable scene. Indeed, one of the most famous moments from Sixteen Candles is when Long Duk Dong is discovered unconscious on the Baker family’s front lawn. And fans of the John Hughes classic can stage their own recreation should they visit the property that’s still standing in the Illinois city of Evanston.

22. Noah’s fixer-upper

Situated on Martin’s Point Plantation on Wadmala Island, South Carolina, the house that Ryan Gosling’s Noah works his magic on in The Notebook was built way back in 1772. But despite being centuries old, the building didn’t need such DIY in real life. Indeed, the residence is in immaculate condition. Producers were therefore forced to use some studio trickery to make it look like the dilapidated property we see in the much-loved weepie.

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21. Peg Boggs’ house

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Fans of Tim Burton’s fantasy romance Edward Scissorhands can actually visit the neighborhood that appears in the love story. Indeed, director Burton hired out and painted no less than 50 houses in the Florida community of Lutz to get the exact look he wanted for the 1990 hit. And one of these included the home of Dianne Wiest’s Peg Boggs.

20. The Kill House

It’s the setting for one of the most terrifying films of all time. But the home of the cannibal family that mutilates a bunch of young adults in The Texas Chainsaw Massacre is now used for much more palatable purposes. Indeed, in 1998 the building was transported from the Texan city of Round Rock to Kingsland and turned into a café. The establishment initially decided to utilize its horror movie history by showcasing a Leatherface dummy. However, this has since reportedly – and perhaps wisely – been removed.

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19. Doughboy’s house

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John Singleton’s Boyz n the Hood was one of the most important African-American films of the 1990s. And fans can still visit one of its character’s homes, which, apart from its color, remains largely unchanged from its 1991 big screen appearance. Indeed, if they head to 5911 Cimarron Street in Los Angeles, they will find the house of Doughboy, played by rapper-turned-actor Ice Cube. But sadly they’re unlikely to find his beloved ’64 Chevy Impala.

18. Rocky Balboa’s block

Several locations in the Rocky franchise have become hugely popular tourist attractions. Visitors to the Philadelphia Museum of Art might even be compelled to recreate the scene where the titular boxer runs up its many outside steps. But fans of Sylvester Stallone’s brainchild can also head for another lesser-known part of Rocky mythology. Indeed, if you fancy seeing where the boxer once resided, check out the Kensington apartment nestled on East Tusculum Street.

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17. Buffalo Bill’s home

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Situated in the rural Pennsylvania village known as Layton, this rather unsuspecting-looking property once spent a year on the market. Then, it ended up being bought for $100,000 less than its owner originally wanted. Perhaps the building’s affiliation with a chilling cannibal movie deterred buyers. Indeed, the exterior of 8 Circle Street was used for Buffalo Bill’s home in The Silence of The Lambs. But thankfully the scene where he pursues Jodie Foster’s lawyer wasn’t shot in its basement, but rather on a soundstage.

16. M’Lynn’s home

Fans of ensemble drama Steel Magnolias can pretend they are good old Southern Belles themselves if they head to the Los Angeles town of Natchitoches. There, they will find the classic brick house owned by Sally Field’s M’Lynn. And it appears pretty much the same as it did back in 1989. The building on 320 Jefferson Street has since been converted into a bed and breakfast, and much of its surrounding area was also used to shoot the classic tearjerker.

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15. Marley’s home

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Unlike most buildings on this list, the idyllic stone property featured in Marley and Me was used for both interior and exterior shots. So fans of the classic dog movie who want to take a look should head for 1178 Meetinghouse Road in the Philadelphia town of Chadds Ford. There, they will find the land that was put on the market for approximately $1.5 million in 2011.

14. Tony Stark’s home

You wouldn’t expect Tony Stark, aka Iron Man, to have an ordinary home. And the makers of Robert Downey Jr.’s cinematic outings certainly didn’t disappoint in finding an abode fit for a Marvel superhero. Indeed, Stark’s home is a stunning 11,000 square-foot property situated in the Californian city of San Diego. In fact, it actually went on the market in 2014 for an incredible $117.2 million! The house boasts six bathrooms, four bedrooms and personal passage to a nearby beach.

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13. Phil Connors’ B&B

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Bill Murray’s weatherman was famously forced to relive the same day waking up at a Pennsylvania bed and breakfast in Groundhog Day. However, the building featured in the classic was actually located on 344 Freemont Street, in the Illinois town of Woodstock. It’s also a B&B in real life, albeit with the different name of The Cherry Tree Inn. And no doubt its owners would argue that waking up there every single day would be no bad thing indeed.

12. The Rockford Peaches’ boarding house

This Victorian building was used to house both the actual and the fictionalized versions of the groundbreaking ladies baseball team known as the Rockford Peaches. Tom Hanks, Geena Davis and Madonna were just a few of the famous faces who arrived at 612 N. Main Street in the Kentucky city of Henderson to film the 1992 film A League of Their Own. Nearly two decades later, the property – minus its famous flowery wallpaper – was placed on the market for $800,000.

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11. Copperhead’s home

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This pleasant suburban home doesn’t look like it would feature in one of the bloodiest martial arts movies ever to come out of Hollywood. But the Los Angeles property is, in fact, where Quentin Tarantino’s Kill Bill Vol. 1 begins. Indeed, in the opening scene Uma Thurman’s The Bride visits an old foe who has attempted to reinvent herself as a picture-perfect housewife. But it’s not long before the pair are engaging in a battle to the death in the contrastingly serene house.

10. The Money Pit house

It’s fair to say that the house featured in The Money Pit was just as much of a character as the ones portrayed by Shelley Long and Tom Hanks. The rundown Long Island mansion that the unlucky pair try to restore originally belonged to a publisher called Eric Ridder. But in 2002 Christina and Rich Makowsky purchased the property. And they later told the New York Times that their own renovation attempts echoed those in the comedy.

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9. Charlie Blackwood’s house

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Played by Kelly McGillis, Charlie Blackwood lived in a charming Victorian two-bedroom cottage while romancing Tom Cruise in Top Gun. And the history of her house is almost as interesting as the action drama’s plot. Constructed in 1887 in Oceanside, San Diego County, by Dr. Henry Graves, the property was declared historic in 2005. Several years later, a luxury hotel project estimated at $209 million was approved by the city which reportedly saw the house converted into a coffee shop.

8. The Parker house

It’s easy to spot the charming Parker family home which featured heavily in the much-loved A Christmas Story if you’re at 3159 W. 11th Street in Cleveland. Just look for the iconic leg lamp, complete with fishnet stockings, that’s placed prominently in the front window. Fans of the tale can actually spend the night in the house, which also has a gift shop and museum.

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7. Buddy’s dad’s apartment block

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You get two movie homes for the price of one when it comes to 55 Central Park West in New York. The the imposing apartment building was first seen onscreen in Ghostbusters as the home of Sigourney Weaver’s Dana. It was later gatecrashed by the ultra-powerful entity known as Gozer the Gozerian. Two decades later it became another cinematic focal point as the place where Buddy’s father resides in festive classic Elf.

6. Nora Dinsmoor’s estate

The 1998 reworking of Great Expectations relocated the characters from Victorian London to the modern-day United States. And a grandiose garden estate in the Florida city of Sarasota was chosen to house the reclusive character Nora Dinsmoor. The Venetian-style property was constructed in 1924 and was initially owned by circus pioneer John Ringling. However, it was in desperate need of repair when the crew for the Charles Dickens adaptation set up camp. Thankfully, four years later a successful renovation began and fans can now even hold their wedding there.

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5. The Martini home

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The majority of It’s A Wonderful Life was filmed on a large set spanning four acres. It was specially designed at a ranch and was later demolished in the 1950s. However, one property featured in the Christmas staple is still standing today. Indeed, if you head for La Canada Flintridge, California – specifically for 4587 Viro Road – you will find the house bought by Mr. and Mrs. Martini in the Frank Capra classic. And more than 70 years on, it looks pretty much exactly the same.

4. The Godfather estate

This sprawling Beverly Hills estate from 1927 plays a part in The Godfather’s most iconic scene – the moment Jack Woltz wakes up with a horse’s head in his bed. Designed by Gordon B. Kaufmann for banker Milton Getz, the mansion was later bought by publishing magnate William Randolph Hearst. And it became a part of U.S. political history in 1953 when John F. and Jackie Kennedy honeymooned there. In 2018 it was put on the market for a whopping $135 million.

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3. Jackie Treehorn’s home

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The extravagant home belonging to Jackie Treehorn in the Coen brothers’ The Big Lebowski was owned by millionaire James Goldstein at the time of filming. And the NBA superfan ensured that the property could be admired for years to come by donating it to the Los Angeles Country Museum of Art in 2016. Goldstein also gave the house’s contents to the museum in a bid to embolden architects of the future.

2. Jay Gatsby’s mansion

The set design team on The Great Gatsby certainly put the work in to help make the titular millionaire’s home look as luxurious as possible. In fact, they reportedly spent no less than 14 weeks constructing and decorating various features for the mansion featured in Baz Luhrmann’s epic. The building in question, complete with opulent master bedroom, grand ballroom and library, is actually a real one. Indeed, it was once a seminary in the director’s hometown of Sydney.

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1. Susan Walker’s dream home

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The dream home that Natalie Wood’s Susan Walker asks for in the original Miracle on 34th Street is still standing. It was built four years before the Christmas classic’s release in 1947 and now boasts an estimated price of $763,000. Fans of the film regularly flock to the building, situated in the Long Island town of Port Washington.

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