When YouTubers Explored Pink Floyd’s Abandoned $13M Mansion, They Found Some Insane Items Inside

Image: YouTube/Exploring with Fighters

When a pair of explorers traveled to a rural area of England, they were heading there on a mission: to venture inside an abandoned building. The property they were seeking was no mere dilapidated shack, however, but a $13 million mansion that had once been owned by a member of Pink Floyd. And when the intrepid duo reached the home in question, they could probably never have guessed what they would ultimately find there.

Image: Instagram/exploringwithfighters

Dan Dixon is an urban explorer from the United Kingdom. Also known as “Urbexing,” urban exploration is a trend whereby people investigate derelict buildings and areas. Dixon, for one, describes himself as having a “passion for history, architecture and decay.”

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Now, in January 2017 this explorer started a YouTube channel called “Exploring with Fighters.” Dixon has since uploaded dozens of videos that see him visiting the likes of deserted houses, hotels, theme parks and factories. And over the course of a year and a half, the intrepid investigator has built up a following of over 97,000 subscribers, with his uploads having garnered nearly eight million views in total to date.

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But one video, which was shared to YouTube in September 2017, sees Dixon and his friend investigate one particularly intriguing venue. To do just that, the duo set off at 4:00 a.m. and traveled for four hours to Oxfordshire in southern England. The explorers soon discovered, though, that the trip was well worth it.

Image: YouTube/Exploring with Fighters

Specifically, the YouTubers went to Hook End Manor, which sits not far from the village of Checkendon, and the property itself is a pretty special place. For one thing, the large home was once owned by David Gilmour, a guitarist and vocalist for the iconic band Pink Floyd. And when the investigators stepped inside the mansion, they were stunned.

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But Hook End Manor had quite the long and storied history before Dixon and his buddy had even arrived. The Elizabethan-era property, which has a whopping 11 bedrooms and sits on 25 acres of land, was reportedly initially constructed in 1580 for the Bishop of Reading. Businessman Sir Charles Clore is among the other notable former owners of the mansion.

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Eventually, though, Alvin Lee from blues rock band Ten Years After bought the manor and converted a portion of the property into a recording studio. Hence, musical greats such as Rod Stewart and Tom Jones have laid down tracks at Hook End Manor.

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It was Lee, though, who sold the house to Gilmour in 1980. And on the grounds, Gilmour kept the inflatable pig of Pink Floyd’s that was used in promotional efforts for the album Animals. He also cut part of the band’s 1987 album, A Momentary Lapse of Reason, in the manor’s recording studio.

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The mansion later went to West Side Productions, the producers of recording artists Morrissey and Madness, before it was bought by Trevor Horn during the ’90s. Famous during the ’80s, Horn was part of The Buggles, the group responsible for the hit song “Video Killed The Radio Star.” In addition, the ex-pop star is a well-known music producer who has worked with many acts, including Seal and Frankie Goes To Hollywood.

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And Hook End Manor was Horn’s family home, which he shared with his wife Jill Sinclair. However, in 2006, tragedy struck at the mansion. Back then, the couple’s son Aaron, who was 22 at the time, was visiting from college when there was a terrible accident.

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On that occasion, the student was firing rounds from a BB gun into targets in the grounds of the house. But he had no idea that his mother was in the garden too – until he accidentally shot her in the neck. Sinclair was subsequently taken to hospital, where it was discovered that she had suffered damage to her brain as the result of a ruptured artery.

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As a result, Sinclair was in a coma for several years. Then in 2012 Horn went on to state that his wife was no comatose; even so, she could not “speak, move, or smile.” Sadly, the wife and mother died of cancer in 2014 at the age of 61; by that point, her husband had already sold the manor where the accident had occurred. The property was then reportedly bought by British musician Mark White, but the house seemed to have been left untouched ever since it changed hands.

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Dixon, meanwhile, had heard rumors that the property had been abandoned, and so he went to see for himself. And while he had been worried that the explorers would not be able to gain access to the building, they actually walked straight in. Dixon explained that it wasn’t illegal to do so, either. “In the U.K., there is no criminal trespassing,” he said on YouTube. “We can legally go in there with an open door. It’s a civil trespass, [a] civil matter only.”

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Dixon and his friend therefore started to explore the mansion. And while he described the place as “amazing” and “untouched,” the urbexer added that there was still a “lot of damp” and work required to update it. Now, one of the first things that the group saw was a room with a snooker table in it.

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“It’s set up perfectly. Oh wow, this is absolutely amazing,” Dixon said. “Pink Floyd probably sat around and chilled out and played snooker in this room.” There was also a dining table and chairs for ten with china on display. But while at first glance the rooms looked pristine, huge cobwebs in the corners suggested that the house hadn’t actually been taken care of in years.

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The explorers also found a room with peeling wallpaper and sheet music left open on a piano. Meanwhile, photos strewn about a countertop gave the area a distinctly creepy feel. That was nothing, however, compared to what they found in the basement.

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You see, down in the dank cellar was a headstone for a seven-year-old boy. The child, named Little Jack, had tragically died in 1909 – and the group couldn’t believe what they were seeing. As the explorers told the site Get Reading, “It was quite eerie; the pool and snooker tables with games set up were definitely a bit spooky. It was a very interesting experience looking around there, like it was a whole life frozen in time.”

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And, after the video was shared online, people praised Exploring With Fighters for their amazing discovery. A number of viewers also declared that they loved watching the clip. “This was rock gold! What a find!” one YouTube commenter exclaimed. Another person added, “You guys make the explore worth watching; you have so much heart and passion in what you do. Awesome explore, guys; big thumbs up.”

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Meanwhile, the explorers have visited other deserted buildings, as well as supposedly haunted graveyards, in the time since they posted the clip – which has been viewed more than 465,000 times. Then, several weeks later, Dixon shared another video after having visited the manor for a second time – and revealed that it isn’t uninhabited any longer. As the urbexer said, “The owner just turned up, and it’s pretty mad. [The house is] not abandoned now.”

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Dixon went on, “It’s lived in, there’s lights on, [and] there’s cars in the driveway. [The owner] seemed pretty angry at first but said he’s got nothing against the hobby. It’s pretty cool, but [the house is] not abandoned. Maybe this has prompted whoever owned it to move back into the property, but it’s definitely not abandoned anymore.”

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