When Ryan Dungey Helped A Wheelchair-Bound Boy, Fans Saw The Motocross Star’s True Colors

Image: Instagram/ryandungey

As one of the most successful supercross and motocross competitors in American history, Ryan Dungey has become a role model to many. One such fan of the motorcyclist is a young boy named Gabe Sharp, who has sadly had his medical issues. Yet with the support of his hero, Gabe was able to do something spectacular.

Image: Paul Archuleta/FilmMagic

Dungey is one of the most decorated motocross and supercross racers of all time. He has triumphed in every major American race, as well as having won the biggest global event on three separate occasions. However, his racing days are behind him now – and so he has quite another focus in life.

Image: Michael Kovac/Getty Images for ESPN

Following the cancer-related passing of his grandmother 14 years ago, Dungey became involved in numerous charitable endeavors. One such undertaking was aimed at helping St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, an institution based in Memphis, Tennessee. It was through these efforts, in fact, that Dungey came into contact with young Gabe Sharp.

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Image: Jason Davis/Getty Images for Feld Entertainment

Sharp had been admitted to St. Jude’s in the spring of 2018 because of a cancerous tumor in his brain. While there, he received treatment which ultimately led him to overcome his disease – but there were complications. The young boy was stricken with posterior fossa syndrome, a condition which can materialize in the wake of brain surgery. This left him bound to a wheelchair.

Image: Jason Davis/Getty Images for Feld Entertainment

While he was in hospital, Sharp was introduced to Dungey – and the pair swiftly became pals. And after some time, the boy was able to show off his progress to Dungey at an event for St. Jude’s. Over a year after being forced into wheelchair, Sharp started walking again during a fundraising run for the hospital. Supported by his mother and Dungey, the boy showed that it’s possible to overcome the most difficult hurdles.

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