Ernest Hemingway Thought The FBI Was Tracking Him. Then 50 Years On Secret Files Revealed The Truth

ADVERTISEMENT

Image: Kurt Hutton/Picture Post/Getty Images

It’s November 1960, and celebrated writer Ernest Hemingway is heading off on his annual shooting trip with friends. But this time, something is wrong. And as Hemingway rants about the Feds tracking his every move, those who know him best begin to despair. Eventually, he takes his own life – but it will be decades before the sinister truth is revealed.

Image: via Wikimedia Commons

Born in the Chicago suburb of Oak Park, Illinois, in July 1899, Hemingway was immersed in the arts from a young age. In fact, his musician mother Grace encouraged him to learn the cello – a skill that would later be reflected in his acclaimed writing. And in January 1916 his debut article was published in the high-school newspaper.

ADVERTISEMENT

Image: via Wikimedia Commons

After graduating, Hemingway continued to pursue a career in writing, taking a job as a junior reporter for The Kansas City Star. And there, he began to hone the minimal, concise technique that would come to define him. Then, at just 18 years old, he signed up to support his country during World War I.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT