A 7,000-Year-Old Mass Grave Discovered In Germany Reveals A Dark Truth About Ancient Farmers

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Image: Christian Meyer via Live Science

Farming came to central Europe in the early Neolithic age about 7,500 years ago. Archaeologists call that period the “linear pottery culture” because the people of the time, who were settled in small villages and sustained themselves by primitive farming, made ceramic vessels with characteristic linear patterns.

Image: Roman Grabolle

As these people lived and died 7,000 years ago and left no written records, however, when it comes to knowing their beliefs and their culture, we are largely in the dark. So even the most eminent archaeologists still often have no choice but to fall back on educated speculation.

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Image: D. Groneborn, Römisches Germanisches Zentralmuseum

Now fast-forward to 2006. A gang of road workers were digging at Schöneck-Kilianstädten, about 12 miles from the city of Frankfurt in Germany. But what their tools turned up from the earth came as a complete shock. Tumbled into a ditch, they found a collection of human bones. At that stage, of course, the age of the bones was impossible to know.

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