A Danish Couple Out Using Their Metal Detectors Discovered An Immaculate 3,000-Year-Old Weapon

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Image: Søren Kiehn, Museum Vestsjælland / Museum Vestsjælland

On one evening in 2016, two Danish amateur archaeologists were out on a walk. Lis Therkildsen and Ernst Christiansen also had a metal detector with them as they went, and as they crossed a field, that detector started to give a signal. So, Therkildsen and Christiansen dug about 12 inches into the ground until part of a metal object appeared. And when they later found out what they had discovered, they may have been astonished.

Image: Jeff Fusco/Getty Images

Metal detecting has become an increasingly popular hobby over the years, with its exponents ranging from serious amateurs like Therkildsen and Christiansen through to hobbyists hoping to find a buried treasure trove. Most of the time, though, detectorists are more likely to turn up ring pulls or other trash than any gold.

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Image: STEFAN SAUER/AFP/Getty Images

Indeed, one long-time detectorist with 40 years of experience, Englishman Steve Critchley, told the The Independent in 2017, “There are those who think it’s a way to make some easy money. I tell them they’re better off putting [money] on the lottery – the odds are much better than expecting to find something valuable while metal detecting.”

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