Archaeologists In Israel Claim They’ve Discovered The Place Where Jesus Turned Water Into Wine

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Father Eugenio Alliata, both a priest and an eminent archaeologist at Jerusalem’s Studium Biblicum Franciscanum museum, combines religious faith with rigorous scientific methods. He takes a philosophical view of the relationship between tradition and science, believing that each has its contribution to make to scholarship.

Image: M.chohan

Speaking to National Geographic in 2017, he said, “It will be something rare, strange, to have archaeological proof for [a specific person] 2,000 years ago… Tradition gives more life to archaeology, and archaeology gives more life to tradition. Sometimes they go together well, sometimes not, which is more interesting.”

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Image: Giotto di Bondone

We’ll come on to the hunt for the site where Jesus turned water into wine in a moment, but first let’s take a closer look at the miracle itself. As we’ve seen, the incident is only recorded in the Gospel According to John. We don’t know who wrote John, but traditionally he’s believed to have been the man referred to in John itself as a “disciple whom Jesus loved.”

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